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Magalí Herrera, A Spark of Light in this World

Where?
Collection de l'Art Brut
When
From 08.03.2024 to 01.09.2024
Price
From
12 CHF
The Collection de l’Art Brut is holding a retrospective of the works of Magalí Herrera (1914-1992). The exhibition will feature every piece by the Uruguayan artist held in the museum's collection, spanning the full length of her career. A selection of items from her personal archives will also go on display, including an intense series of letters between Herrera and Jean Dubuffet, the first of which was written in 1967.

Useful information

Address

Collection de l'Art Brut
Avenue des Bergières 11
1004 Lausanne

How to get there

Schedules

From 08.03.2024 to 01.09.2024
Open
Closed
Monday
Closed
Tuesday
11:00 - 18:00
Wednesday
11:00 - 18:00
Thursday
11:00 - 18:00
Friday
11:00 - 18:00
Saturday
11:00 - 18:00
Sunday
11:00 - 18:00

Full price

12 CHF

AVS/AI

6 CHF

Groups from 6 people

6 CHF

Children up to 16 years, students, apprentices, unemployed

Free

Carer of a disabled person

Free

Closed on Mondays (except in July and August). 
Public holidays: open from 11am to 6pm. 
Free admission on the first Saturday of the month. 
On 24 and 31 December: 11am to 5pm. 
Closed on 25 December and 1 January. 

Access
Bus 3, 20, 21: «Beaulieu-Jomini» stop 

More info

The French artist immediately added her drawings to the collection of the Compagnie de l’Art Brut in Paris. Herrera threw herself fervently into the epistolary relationship, which lasted until 1974. She later entrusted her husband with the task of donating both her entire body of drawings and her private archives to the Collection de l’Art Brut upon her death. She is the only Uruguayan artist to feature in our collection. 

Herrera was born in Rivera, Uruguay. In around 1952, she started painting sporadically. By the early 1960s, she had devoted herself exclusively to this means of expression, painting night and day in a sort of trance. In 1967 and 1968, Herrera spent time in Paris. There, she discovered Art Brut and began exchanging letters with Dubuffet. This correspondence helped her find meaning in her pictorial works. 

When making her art, Herrera gave herself over completely to her imagination, creating pieces that reflected a kind of internal cosmogony. Each of her paintings used the same media: black or white India ink on white, black or coloured paper. She worked slowly and persistently, using high-precision Chinese calligraphy brushes to produce works of exceptional artistry - compositions consisting of dots and lines that, together, represent utopias. This exhibition is a unique opportunity to reconsider Herrera’s distinctive body of work through the lens of the letters she exchanged with Dubuffet. 

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