© Cindy Sherman Courtesy the artist and Hauser & Wirth / Untitled #631, 2010/2023

Cindy Sherman

Where?
Photo Elysée - Musée cantonal pour la photographie
When
From 29.03.2024 to 04.08.2024
Price
From
15 CHF
Cindy Sherman is considered to be one of the most important American artists of her generation. Her ground-breaking photographs have interrogated themes around representation and identity in contemporary media for over four decades.

Useful information

Address

Photo Elysée - Musée cantonal pour la photographie
PLATEFORME 10 - Place de la Gare 17
1003 Lausanne

How to get there

Schedules

From 29.03.2024 to 04.08.2024
Open
Closed
Monday
10:00 - 18:00
Tuesday
Closed
Wednesday
10:00 - 18:00
Thursday
10:00 - 20:00
Friday
10:00 - 18:00
Saturday
10:00 - 18:00
Sunday
10:00 - 18:00

Plateforme 10 tickets - 1 museum, full price (adults aged 26 and over)

15 CHF

Plateforme 10 tickets - 1 museum, reduced price, adults aged 26 and over (AVS, AI, unemployed, students, apprentices)

12 CHF

Plateforme 10 tickets - 1 museum, under the age of 26

Free

Plateforme 10 tickets - 3 museums, full price (adults aged 26 and over)

25 CHF

Plateforme 10 tickets - 3 museums, reduced price, adults aged 26 and over (AVS, AI, unemployed, students, apprentices)

19 CHF

Plateforme 10 tickets - 3 museums, duo (visit for two, adults aged 26 and over)

38 CHF

Plateforme 10 tickets - 3 museums, under the age of 26

Free

Free admission on the first Saturday of the month.
On 24 and 31 December: 10am to 5pm.
Closed on 25 December and 1 January.

Access
CFF train station: 3 minutes on foot
Bus 1, 3, 21, 60: «Lausanne-Gare» stop
Bus 6: «Cécil» stop
Metro M2: «Lausanne-Gare» stop 

More info

In this new body of work, the artist collages parts of her own face to construct the identities of various characters, using digital manipulation to accent the layered aspects and plasticity of the self. 

Sherman has removed any scenic backdrops or mise-en-scène-the focus of this series is the face. She combines a digital collaging technique using black and white and color photographs with other traditional modes of transformation, such as make-up, wigs and costumes, to create a series of unsettling characters who laugh, twist, squint and grimace in front of the camera. To create the fractured characters, Sherman has photographed isolated parts of her body–her eyes, nose, lips, skin, hair, ears–which she cuts, pastes and stretches onto a foundational image, ultimately constructing, deconstructing and then reconstructing a new face. 

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